Foreign Exchange Reserves at the Bank of Israel, August 2021

Israel’s foreign exchange reserves at the end of August 2021 stood at $205,912 million, an increase of $4,217 million from their level at the end of the previous month. The reserves represent 46.8 percent of GDP (Figure 1).

 

The increase was the result of:

a.      Foreign exchange purchases by the Bank of Israel totaling approximately $1,641 million.

b.     An allocation by the IMF4 totaling $2,613 million.

c.      A revaluation[1] that increased the reserves by approximately $392 million.

 

In contrast, the increase was partly offset by:

a.      Private sector transfers of approximately $203 million.

b.     Government transfers to abroad totaling approximately $226 million.

 




 

Israel's Foreign Exchange Reserves ($ million)

 

Date

Reserves excluding IMF (including reserves bought under the natural gas purchase program)

Reserves at the IMF[2]

Total Foreign Exchange Reserves

August 2020

159,789

1,899

161,688

September 2020

158,700

1,884

160,584

October 2020

158,859c

1,889

160,748c

November 2020

165,033c

1,914

166,947c

December 2020

171,242c

2,055

173,297c

January 2021

177,444c

2,057

179,501c

February 2021

182,990c

2,065

185,055c

March 2021

183,664c

2,016

185,680c

April 2021

191,957c

2,043

194,000c

May 2021

196,348

2,002

198,350

June 2021

198,192

1,983

200,175

July 2021

199,709c

1,986

201,695c

August 2021

201,310

4,602d

205,912

 



a Includes Bank of Israel payments and receipts in foreign currency.

b This column includes Special Drawing Rights (SDRs), the balance of NAB loans, and the balance of Israel's reserve tranche at the IMF.

c Updated after the original date of publication.

d On August 23, the International Monetary Fund allocated approximately $2.6 billion to Israel, as part of the IMF allocation to all of the organization’s member countries totaling $650 billion. Together with this increase in IMF reserves, a long-term liability to the IMF—in the amount that was allocated—was added to the Bank of Israel balance sheet.​